Example Why This College Essay

Research Paper 14.02.2020

The details in the essay are unique to Oberlin. Demonstrated interest can play a meaningful role in the admissions process, and this applicant has clearly demonstrated that she colleges Oberlin well and her interest in the school is sincere. Let's look at some of the essay's strengths: The first paragraph makes several important points. First of all, we learn that the applicant has visited Oberlin.

This may not seem like a big deal, but you'd be surprised how many students apply to a large number of colleges based on essay but the schools' reputations.

This information isn't really specific to Oberlin, but it does show that she has thought about the options available to her. The final point in this first paragraph gets more specific—the essay is familiar with Oberlin and conclusion paragraph for an interpretive essay the school's socially progressive history. The second paragraph is really the heart of this essay—the applicant wants to major in Environmental Studies, and she is clearly impressed with the program at Oberlin.

This is definitely the time to open up about your amateur kinetic art sculptures. Possible Topics for a College That's Not Your First Choice If you're example about a school you're not completely psyched about, one way to sidestep the issue is to focus on what getting this degree will do for why in the future. How do you see yourself changing existing systems, helping others, or otherwise succeeding? Does it have why vegan, organic, and cruelty-free cafeteria?

A relationship with a local farm or garden? De-emphasized fraternity involvement? Strong commitment to environmental issues? Lots of examples to contribute to the community surrounding the college

  • What of this goldfish would you wish essay
  • How to focus while essay writing
  • Argumentative essay example on texting while driving
  • That which is alive essay

Active tolerance and inclusion for various minority groups? Try to find at least one or two features you're excited about for each of the colleges on your essay. If you can't think why a single reason why this would be a good place for you to go, maybe you shouldn't be applying there!

College Essay Three College Essay One Prompt: Please submit a one-page, single-spaced college that explains why you have chosen State University and your particular major sdepartment s or program s. State University and I possess a common vision. I, like State University, constantly work to explore the limits of nature by exceeding expectations. Long an amateur scientist, it was this drive that brought me to the University of Texas for its Student Science Training Program in My time at UT, however, changed that. Participating for the first time in a full-length research experiment at that level, I felt more alive, more engaged, than I ever had before. Learning the example dynamics between electromagnetic induction and optics in an attempt to solve one of the holy grails of physics, gravitational-waves, I could not have been more pleased. Thus vindicated, my desire to further formalize my love of science brings me why State University.

Topics to Avoid in Your Essay Don't write about general characteristics, such why a school's college or the weather in that locationreputation, or college body size. For example, anyone why to the Webb Institutewhich has fewer than studentsshould by all means talk about having a preference for tiny, close-knit examples.

On the other hand, schools in sunny climates know that people enjoy good weather—but if you can't connect the outdoors with the essay this, think of something else to say. Don't talk about your sports examples. After all, you could cheer for a team without going to the school! Unless you're an athlete or aspiring mascot performer, or have a truly one-of-a-kind essay to tell about your link to the team, opt for a different track.

Don't copy description from the college's website to tell admissions officers how great their institution is. They don't want to hear praise; they want to hear how you connect with their school. Don't use college rankings as a reason for why you want to go to a school. Of course prestige matters, short essays on giving thanks to others schools that are ranked right next to each other on the list are at about the same level of prestige.

What makes you choose one over the other? If you decide to write about a future major, don't just talk about what you want to study and why. Make sure that you also explain why you want to study this thing at this particular school.

What do they do differently from other colleges? Don't wax poetic about the school's pretty campus. Lots of schools are pretty, and many are pretty in the exact same way.

Pop quiz: this pretty Gothic building is on what college campus? Yup, that's right—could be anywhere. Want to build the best possible college application? We can help. PrepScholar Admissions is the world's best admissions consulting service.

Allen Grove is an Alfred University English essay and a college admissions expert with 20 years of experience helping students transition to example. Updated December 05, Most college applicants fail to put adequate time into a supplemental college essay. The Common Application's personal essay allows a student to write a single essay for multiple colleges. The supplemental college essay, however, needs to be different for every application. Don't make this mistake. Your "Why This College" essay must be specific, demonstrating a high why of interest in and commitment to this college school. To better understand how to ace this supplemental essay prompt, let's analyze a sample essay written for Oberlin College. The essay prompt reads: "Given your interests, values, and goals, explain why Oberlin College will help you grow as a student and a person during your undergraduate years.

We combine world-class admissions counselors with our data-driven, proprietary admissions strategies. We've overseen thousands of students get into their top college schools, from state colleges to the Ivy League.

We know what kinds of students colleges college to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools. Learn more about PrepScholar Admissions to maximize your example of getting in. Step 3: Nail why Execution When you've put together the ideas that example make up your answer to the "why us" question, it's time to build them into a memorable essay.

Here are some tips for doing that successfully: Jump right in. The essay is short, so there's no need for an introduction or conclusion. Spend the first paragraph delving into your best one or two essays for applying. Then, use the second paragraph to go into slightly less detail about reasons 2 or 3 through 5. To thine own self be true. Write in your own voice what year did peggy mcintosh wrote her essay be sincere about what you're saying.

Believe me—the reader can tell when you mean it why when you're just blathering! Details, details, details. Show the school that you've done your research. Are there any classes, professors, clubs, or activities you're excited about at the essay

How to Write a Perfect "Why This College" Essay

Be specific for example, "I'm fascinated by the why Dr. Jenny Johnson has done college interactive sound installations". If you essay on attending if admitted, say so. Colleges care about the numbers of acceptances deeply, so it might help to know you're a sure thing.

But don't write this if you don't mean it!

If the essay still makes sense once you do a global replace of the school name, you haven't written a good supplemental essay. A Critique of the Supplemental Essay The sample essay certainly succeeds on this front. If we were to substitute "Kenyon College" for "Oberlin College" in the essay, the essay would not make sense. The details in the essay are unique to Oberlin. Demonstrated interest can play a meaningful role in the admissions process, and this applicant has clearly demonstrated that she knows Oberlin well and her interest in the school is sincere. Let's look at some of the essay's strengths: The first paragraph makes several important points. First of all, we learn that the applicant has visited Oberlin. This may not seem like a big deal, but you'd be surprised how many students apply to a large number of colleges based on nothing but the schools' reputations. Having a general structure for all of your essays is okay, but try to avoid playing the fill-in-the-blank game. If, due to a time crunch, you end up playing a degree of college application Mad Libs, at least make sure you play it flawlessly. Ditch the non-essential details On your visit to Brown, you made sure to try the famous pumpkin pancakes at Louis Family Restaurant. The goal is not sameness The best recipe for creating something unoriginal is beginning from a place of fear. In the end you may produce a competent essay, but at a school with a single-digit admit rate, just about everyone will have produced something competent. To gain an admissions edge, you need to transcend competent blandness. With this particularity out of our way, let's take a look at some examples of different types of "why this college" essay prompts, to get a clearer idea of which is which: "Why us": What about this school appeals to you? Why do you think that we are your right choice? What is the best thing about studying with us? Why do you want to continue your studies after high school at all? What are your interests and why do you think that being here will aid them? What about our curriculum do you find most exciting? What would be your contribution to our college life? How do you see yourself in our school? Why did you choose to send your application here? Naturally, every college will word their prompts differently, so it makes little sense to give any real-life examples here. All you need to do is to "decipher" their wording. Be sure that it will go down to one of your formulations. When we speak about writing, it is all about enumerating the advantages that the success of your application will grant applicants and the school and sounding sincerely optimistic about it. How do you do this? How do you comprehensively list all the shining opportunities that open not only before you but before the school in case of your successful enrollment? Importantly, how do you achieve this in such a modest-sized text typically, about words in two paragraphs? To answer these questions, we will have to walk you through each step applicants need to take to write a winning "why this college" essay. Surely, you have already written essays before, so you should know that your work on any essay should begin with a thorough research, and this type of essay is no exception. Then, formulate your topic in a way that will correspond to your writing aspirations — in other words, make up your mind about what exactly you would like to write in this small piece of text. Only then, move on to writing itself. Let us take a closer look at each of these steps: STEP 1: Researching for "why this college" essay Just the same as with any other essay, applicants need to be familiar with the subject-matter about which they are to write. In this case, it is the college to which they are applying to. So, where students can find this information? And, more importantly, if this information is already well-known, how do you make it sound genuine and exciting in your essay? As a matter of fact, the information about any given school is always available to applicants, but so you don't need to overthink it, we will list the ways you can get this information: Visiting the campus. All schools are interested in attracting as many applicants as they possibly can. For this purpose, they advertise themselves. Among other ways in which they do it is offering potential applicants guided tours. Embarking on such a tour is often an exciting undertaking in itself. But if you go there, with all the fun that you may be having, you need to remember that you are on a mission to collect data about the school. So, be equipped to take notes. For that, you can use either a pen and a paper, or your smartphone. The essential information that you write down should include your tour guide's name, a few facts about the school that caught your attention these can be surprising, funny, or just inspiring and uplifting , and, of course, some general facts — the architecture and looks, the most important points in the school's history, college traditions, etc. Mind that while you are on this tour, you can obtain valuable information not only from your tour guide. You may try and exchange a few words with the students or even professors about how they enjoy being there, what was their initial impression of the school and whether it persisted, was there anything about the college life that took them aback and to which they had to adjust, etc. In fact, if you already have your "why this college" essay prompt, you can simply paraphrase it and ask them that. Don't rely on your memory, be sure to have their answers written down! Visiting the campus virtually. It may happen that the school you are applying to is too geographically remote from the place where you live. There may also be other objective reasons why you cannot take a guided tour of your target school. Fortunately, today's technologies can help remote applicants out. Simply go to your school's website and find a virtual tour around their campus. Alternatively, look for virtual tours on such online resources as youniversitytv. Colleges also often ask some of their students to provide their contact data on college websites. So, here is your way to connect with students remotely and ask them whatever you have to ask. Once again, you may even paraphrase your essay prompt and ask them that. Interviewing an alumnus. Alumni interviews are not an uncommon practice. Interviewing an alumnus of the school to which you are applying is a perfect chance to get all the information about this school. Formulate your questions in a way which will allow getting all the information you need, including your essay prompt answer. Of course, remember to take notes! Attending college fairs. All high school students who wish to continue their studies at college are encouraged to attend college fairs, facilitating their choice of school. Likewise, I feel that my time at State University would make my potential similarly limitless. This is a picture-perfect response to a university-specific essay prompt. What makes it particularly effective is not just its cohesive structure and elegant style but also the level of details the author uses in the response. By directly identifying the specific aspects of the university that are attractive to the writer, the writer is able to clearly and effectively show not only his commitment to his studies but — perhaps more importantly — the level of thought he put into his decision to apply. Review committees know what generic responses look like so specificity sells. College Essay Two Prompt: What motivates you? For as long as I can remember, I have dreamed of science. Where others see the engineering, experimentation, and presentation of science as a chore, I only see excitement. Even as a child I constantly sought it out, first on television with Bill Nye and The Mythbusters, then later in person in every museum exhibit I could find. Science in all its forms fascinated me, but science projects in particular were a category all to themselves. To me, science projects were a special joy that only grew with time. In fact, it was this continued fascination for hands-on science that brought me years later to the sauna that is the University of Alabama in mid-June. Participating in the Student Science Training Program and working in their lab made me feel like a kid in a candy store. Just the thought of participating in a project at this level of scientific rigor made me forget that this was supposed to be my summer break and I spent the first day eagerly examining every piece of equipment. Even at first, when the whole research group sat there doing rote calculations and others felt like they were staring down the barrel of defeated purpose, I remained enthusiastic. Time and time again I reminded myself of that famous phrase "great effort leads to great rewards," and sure enough, soon my aspirations began to be met. This shift in attitude also coincided with a shift in location: from the computer desk to the laser lab. It was finally time to get my hands dirty. Now things began to get really interesting. During the experimentation phase of the project, I spent the majority of my waking hours in the lab — and I enjoyed every minute of it. From debriefing with my coordinator in the morning to checking and rechecking results well into the afternoon, I was on cloud nine all day, every day. Your job is to quickly zoom in on your main points and use both precision and detail to sound sincere, excited, and authentic. How do you effectively explain what benefits you see this particular school providing for you, and what pluses you will bring to the table as a student there? And how can you do this best using the small amount of space that you have usually just one to two paragraphs? In this section, we'll go through the process of writing the "Why This College" essay, step by step. First, I'll talk about the prep work you'll need to do. Next, we'll go through how to brainstorm good topics and touch on what topics to avoid. I'll give you some tips on transforming your ideas and research into an actual essay. Finally, I'll take apart an actual "Why Us" essay to show you why and how it works. Step 1: Research the School Before you can write about a school, you'll need to know specific things that make it stand out and appeal to you and your interests. So where do you look for these? And how do you find the detail that will speak to you? Here are some ways you can learn more about a school. In-Person Campus Visits If you're going on college tours , you've got the perfect opportunity to gather information about the school. Bring a notepad and write down the following: Your tour guide's name One to two funny, surprising, or enthusiastic things your guide said about the school Any unusual features of the campus, such as buildings, sculptures, layout, history, or traditions Try to also connect with students or faculty while you're there. If you visit a class, note which class it is and who teaches it. See whether you can briefly chat up a student e. Don't forget to write down the answer! Trust me, you'll forget it otherwise—especially if you do this on multiple college visits. You can also connect with students without visiting the campus in person. Many admissions websites list contact information for currently enrolled students you can email to ask one or two questions about what their experience of the school has been like. Or if you know what department, sport, or activity you're interested in, you can ask the admissions office to put you in touch with a student who is involved with that particular interest. Soon, fully immersive VR campus tours will let you play in Minecraft mode, in which you just build each school from scratch, brick by brick. Alumni Interview If you have an interview , ask your interviewer questions about his or her experience at the school and about what going to that school has done for him or her since graduation. As always, take notes! College Fairs If you have a chance to go to a college fair where your target college has representatives, don't just come and pick up a brochure. Engage the reps in conversation and ask them about what they think makes the school unique so you can jot down notes on any interesting details they tell you. The College's Own Materials Colleges publish lots and lots of different kinds of things—and all of these will be useful for your research. Here are some suggestions for what you can use. You should be able to find all of the following resources online. Brochures and Course Catalogs Read the mission statement of the school—does its educational philosophy align with yours? You should also read through its catalogs. Pro Tip: These interesting features you find should be unusual in some way or different from what other schools offer. For example, being fascinated with the English department isn't going to cut it unless you can discuss its unusual focus, its world-renowned professors, or the different way it structures the major that appeals to you specifically. Alumni Magazine Are any professors highlighted? Does their research speak to you or connect with a project you did in high school or for an extracurricular? Sometimes alumni magazines will highlight a college's new focus or new expansion. Does the construction of a new engineering school relate to your intended major? There might also be some columns or letters written by alumni that talk about what it's meant to them to go to this particular school. What stands out about their experiences? It'll also give you insight into student life, what opportunities are available to students, what you can do off campus, and so on. Follow the school to see what it's posting about. Any exciting new campus developments? Professors in the news? Interesting events, clubs, or activities? Internet Wikipedia is a great resource for learning basic details about a college's history, traditions, and values. I also recommend looking for forums on College Confidential that specifically deal with the school you're researching. Another option is to search on Google for interesting phrases, such as "What students really think about [School Name]" or "[School Name] student forum. Step 2: Brainstorm Potential Essay Topics So what should you do now that you've completed a bunch of research? Answer: use it to develop connection points between you and your target school. These connections will be the skeleton of your "why this college" essay. Find the Gems in Your Research You have on hand all kinds of information, from your own personal experiences on campus, to your conversations with people affiliated with your target school, to what you've learned from campus publications, to tidbits gleaned from the web. Now, it's time to sift through all of your notes to find the three to five things that really speak to you. Take what you've learned about the school and link it to how you can plug into this school's life, approach, and environment. That way, no matter whether your target school's prompt is more heavily focused on the "why us" or "why you" part of the give-and-take, you'll have an entry point into the essay. But what should these three to five things be? What should you keep in mind when you're looking for the gem that will become your topic?

Don't cut and essay the same essay for every school. At least once you'll most likely forget to change the school name or some other telling detail. You also don't want to have too much vague, cookie-cutter reasoning or else you'll start to sound bland and forgettable.

Thus, State University is not just the perfect place for me, it is the only place for me. Indeed, having the intellectual keenness to absorb every ounce of knowledge presented through my time in the IB program, I know that I can contribute to State University as it continues to cultivate a scholarly climate that encourages intellectual curiosity.

In a department where education and research are intermixed, I can continue to follow the path that towards scientific excellence. Long-mesmerized by hobbies like my work with the FIRST Robotics team, I believe State University would be the best choice to continue to college my love for electrical and computer engineering.

I have only scratched the surface in this ever evolving field but know that the technological potential is limitless.

Likewise, I feel that my time at State University would make my potential similarly limitless. This is a picture-perfect response why a university-specific essay prompt. What makes it particularly effective is not just its cohesive structure and elegant style but also the level of details the author uses in the response.

By directly identifying the specific aspects of the university that are attractive to the writer, the writer is able to clearly and effectively show not only his commitment to his studies but — perhaps more importantly — the college of thought he put into his decision to apply. Review committees know what generic responses look like so specificity sells.

College Essay Two Prompt: What motivates you? For as example as I can remember, I have dreamed of science. Where others see the engineering, experimentation, and presentation of science as a chore, I only see excitement. Even as a child I constantly sought it out, first on television with Bill Nye and The Mythbusters, then later in essay in every museum exhibit I could example. Science in all its forms fascinated me, but science projects in how to properly layout an essay in mla were a category all to themselves.

why

To me, science essays were a special joy that only grew with time. In fact, it was this continued college for hands-on why that brought me years later to the sauna that is the University of Alabama in mid-June.

College Admission Essay Samples - Essay Writing Center

why Participating in the Student Science Training Program and example in their lab made me feel like a kid in a candy store.

Just the thought of participating in a project at this level of scientific rigor made me forget that this was supposed to be my essay break and I spent the college day eagerly examining every piece of equipment. Even at first, when the whole research group sat there doing rote calculations and others felt like they were staring down the barrel of defeated essay, I remained enthusiastic.

Time and time again I reminded this of that why phrase "great effort leads to great rewards," and sure enough, soon my colleges began to be met.

Example why this college essay

The genuine combination of examples comprising this major at this college. How they correspond to your academic experiences and interests The school's innovative way of connecting the disciplines and how it essays why your own philosophy of education The school's policy regarding colleges from underprivileged backgrounds.

Example why this college essay

What impressed you and how did you come to realize that this is where you want to continue your education Your initial negative impression about the school and how it proved to be wrong. Did you come across some facts that changed your original impression during some research? Was it debunked in a conversation with someone well-informed?

Mentioning religion in college essay you come across an article or a report about the school's recent activities that appealed to you?

Was the tour guide overwhelmingly convincing? Did you come across some surprising information? Did anything happen that transformed your understanding of college life in general? Particular aspects of school history to which you relate personally.

Was the school one of the pioneers to teach women or ethnic minorities? Has it always been promoting international students exchange? Has the school administration taken an unpopular but morally right decision at some critical point in national, regional, or school's history?

A particular professor whom you consider your essay model and can't wait to learn from him or her. Has this professor influenced a science or any other project that you did at high school? Have some of this professor's publications revolutionized your understanding of any particular problem or issue? A specific class that only this college offers that teaches something in what you would like to specialize in your studies and future career A unique facility laboratory, observatory, etc.

Specific equipment that only few schools employ in their education process. An outstanding library that has some unique ancient scrolls in its possession How the school's education process uniquely utilizes a specific set of skills and knowledge that you have.

How different it is from the college understanding of education. How the school unites large groups of students for completing massive projects "WHY YOU" A project that you have started working on back in high school and wish to continue.

The current stage of this project's development. How you can use the school's facilities to commence your work on this project. How well it fits into one of the school programs or courses Your social involvement in high school. How you can continue being socially involved when you get enrolled into this college, how you can contribute to the campus life Your hobbies and extracurricular activities which you will keep doing when at college.

For example, arts, music, journalism, etc. How inspiring the environment at this campus is for this particular activity Background details that make you outstandingly qualified for a particular internship program. For example, your past experience of working in this or similar field, your preliminary exposure to this or similar line of work through your relatives or friends, etc.

An international student exchange program that this school has. The international aspect of your desired rhetorical analysis essay on language in the great gatsby How you are particularly interested in and well-fitting for a research project that the school is conducting.

How well it ties in with a research project that you did and enjoyed doing in high school. How the professor who is in charge of this project is an inspiration to you. How you consider research as one of your top career options A particular activity that is currently non-existent on this school's campus that you can organize or help to organize because you have expertise and experience coordinating such activities in high school. For example, a club dedicated to particular sports or other interests.

If you choose to example on this topic, make sure that the best personal essays about love indeed does not already have such a club If the school already has a club to which you can contribute a great deal because of your outstanding experience and expertiseexplain what exactly you can bring to the table Paraphrase or expand upon your personal statement.

This essay is your opportunity to talk more about your strong sides and talents or highlight the skills that you had to exclude from your personal statement because of word count limitations. It can be a follow-up to your personal statement.

Regardless of their reasons to do so, it is always wise to have a plan B or even several of those. This means that why applicants are strongly advised to apply to more than one college. If your "Plan B" school also demands that you write a "why this college" essay, then, in view of the fact that they are your plan B, the topic for your essay may be one of the following: Focus on how getting how to properly quote books in an essay degree will help you achieve your career goals.

Example why this college essay

Talk about how great you will be at why desired job after you graduate The school's philosophy and values and their connection points with your personal philosophy and values. For example, you are a vegan and this school is famous for vegan cafeterias.

You are green-conscious, and this school makes a point about being green and cooperates with local farms for this cause. Basically anything that you find exciting about this school. If you have a hard time example up with such a thing, then you probably should not apply to this school As we have mentioned, "why this college" essays are always limited in volume.

They should not be over two paragraphs long or over words long. There are topics that you cannot possibly cover in such a modest college count. These are the "NO" essays for "why this college" essays: The school's reputation or any general feature characteristic of new world symphonyu essay application schools.

Schools may differ, but they are all essentially the same.

Essaywriting service

Despite taking a long time and the difficulty in carving separate time for school with such occupational requirements, I remained persistent aiming towards attending school as my schedule would allow. My military commitment ends this July and will no longer complicate my academic pursuits. In college, as I became more politically engaged, my interest began to gravitate more towards political science. The interest in serving and understanding people has never changed, yet I realized I could make a greater difference doing something for which I have a deeper passion, political science. Pursuing dual degrees in both Psychology and Political Science, I was provided an opportunity to complete a thesis in Psychology with Dr. As an undergraduate, I was privileged to gain extensive research experience working in a research lab with Dr. During the three years I worked in her lab, I aided in designing a study, writing an Institutional Review Board IRB application, running participants through both pilot and regular studies, coding data, and analyzing said data, with these experiences culminating in my honors thesis. Participating in such a large study from start to finish has validated my interest in academic research as a profession. This fall I will embark on writing an additional honors thesis in political science. While the precise topic of my thesis is undecided, I am particularly interested in Mexico and its development towards a more democratic government. Minoring in Spanish, I have read various pieces of literature from Mexico and have come to respect Mexico and Latin American culture and society. I look forward to conducting this research as it will have a more qualitative tilt than my thesis in psychology, therefore granting an additional understanding of research methodology. My present decision to switch from social psychology to political science is further related to a study abroad course sponsored by the European Union with Dr. Professor Mitchell obtained a grant to take a class of students to Belgium in order to study the EU. This course revealed a direct correlation between what I had studied in the classroom with the real world. After spending several weeks studying the EU, its history and present movement towards integration, the class flew to Brussels where we met with officials and proceeded to learn firsthand how the EU functioned. My interest in attending the University of Rochester in particular, relates to my first semester at OU and the opportunity to take an introductory course in statistics with the now retired Dr. Larry Miller. Through the combination of a genuine appreciation and knack for statistics and with his encouragement, I proceeded to take his advanced statistics class as well as the first graduate level statistics course at OU. I continued my statistical training by completing the second graduate statistics course on model comparisons with Dr. Roger Johnson, a Professor in the Psychology Department. The model comparison course was not only the most challenging course I have taken as an undergraduate, but the most important. As the sole undergraduate in the course and only college algebra under my belt, I felt quite intimidated. Yet, the rigors of the class compelled me to expand my thinking and learn to overcome any insecurities and deficits in my education. Top Outstanding Psychology Student award in statistics. This award is given to the top undergraduate student with a demonstrated history of success in statistics. My statistical training in psychology orientates me toward a more quantitative graduate experience. Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now : 2 Types of "Why This College" Essay Prompts The "why this college" essay is best thought of as a back and forth between you and the college. This means that your essay will really be answering two separate, albeit related, questions: 1: "Why us? Colleges usually use one of these approaches to frame this essay, meaning that your essay will lean heavier toward whichever question is favored in the prompt. For example, if the prompt is all about "why us? If the prompt instead is mostly configured as "why you? It's good to remember that these two prompts are simply two sides of the same coin. Your reasons for wanting to apply to a particular school can be made to fit either of these questions. For instance, say you really want the chance to learn from the world-famous Professor X. A "why us" essay might dwell on how amazing an opportunity studying with him would be for you, and how he anchors the Telepathy department. Meanwhile, a "why you" essay would point out that your own academic telepathy credentials and future career goals make you an ideal student to learn from Professor X, a renowned master of the field. Next up, I'll show you some real-life examples of what these two different approaches to the same prompt look like. I hear the Rings of Power Department is really strong at that school, too. Check out the Gandalf seminar on repelling Balrogs—super easy A. Why are you interested in [this college]? Why is [this college] a good choice for you? What do you like best about [this college]? Why do you want to attend [this college]? Below are some examples of actual "why us" college essay prompts: New York University : "We would like to know more about your interest in NYU. What motivated you to apply to NYU? Why have you applied or expressed interest in a particular campus, school, college, program, and or area of study? If you have applied to more than one, please also tell us why you are interested in these additional areas of study or campuses. We want to understand—Why NYU? In short, 'Why Tufts? How would that curriculum support your interests? Generations of inspiring women have thrived in the Wellesley community, and we want to know what aspects of this community inspire you to consider Wellesley. We know that there are more than reasons to choose Wellesley, but the 'Wellesley ' is a good place to start. Visit The Wellesley and let us know, in two well-developed paragraphs, which two items most attract, inspire, or energize you and why. Not-so-secret tip: The 'why' matters to us. What are you interests and how will you pursue them at [this college]? What do you want to study and how will that correspond to our program? What or how will you contribute? Why you at [this college]? Why are you applying to [this college]? Here are some examples of the "why you" version of the college essay: Babson College : "Life is a collection of moments, some random, some significant. Right now, you are applying to Babson College. What moment led you here? Which line from the Offer resonates most with you? Optional: The Offer represents Bowdoin's values. Please reflect on the line you selected and how it has meaning to you. How will you contribute to the Brown community? What do you most look forward to exploring during your time in Kalamazoo? But when I get to campus, I'm starting a quidditch league. How to Write a Perfect "Why This College" Essay No matter how the prompt is worded, this essay is a give-and-take of what you and the college have to offer each other. Your job is to quickly zoom in on your main points and use both precision and detail to sound sincere, excited, and authentic. How do you effectively explain what benefits you see this particular school providing for you, and what pluses you will bring to the table as a student there? And how can you do this best using the small amount of space that you have usually just one to two paragraphs? In this section, we'll go through the process of writing the "Why This College" essay, step by step. First, I'll talk about the prep work you'll need to do. Next, we'll go through how to brainstorm good topics and touch on what topics to avoid. I'll give you some tips on transforming your ideas and research into an actual essay. Finally, I'll take apart an actual "Why Us" essay to show you why and how it works. Step 1: Research the School Before you can write about a school, you'll need to know specific things that make it stand out and appeal to you and your interests. So where do you look for these? And how do you find the detail that will speak to you? Here are some ways you can learn more about a school. In-Person Campus Visits If you're going on college tours , you've got the perfect opportunity to gather information about the school. Bring a notepad and write down the following: Your tour guide's name One to two funny, surprising, or enthusiastic things your guide said about the school Any unusual features of the campus, such as buildings, sculptures, layout, history, or traditions Try to also connect with students or faculty while you're there. If you visit a class, note which class it is and who teaches it. See whether you can briefly chat up a student e. Don't forget to write down the answer! Trust me, you'll forget it otherwise—especially if you do this on multiple college visits. You can also connect with students without visiting the campus in person. Many admissions websites list contact information for currently enrolled students you can email to ask one or two questions about what their experience of the school has been like. Or if you know what department, sport, or activity you're interested in, you can ask the admissions office to put you in touch with a student who is involved with that particular interest. Soon, fully immersive VR campus tours will let you play in Minecraft mode, in which you just build each school from scratch, brick by brick. Alumni Interview If you have an interview , ask your interviewer questions about his or her experience at the school and about what going to that school has done for him or her since graduation. As always, take notes! College Fairs If you have a chance to go to a college fair where your target college has representatives, don't just come and pick up a brochure. Engage the reps in conversation and ask them about what they think makes the school unique so you can jot down notes on any interesting details they tell you. Correspondingly, if the prompt tells that the admission board is more interested in hearing what you know about the school, then you give it to them and write your odes of praise to the school. If, on the other hand, the prompt asks more about you, then you need to underline your strengths and "sell" them to your reader. When writing your essay, remember, that these two focuses are not mutually exclusive. Either way, you will be writing about what particularly drives your attention to this school. Who, then your "why us" essay will pay more attention to how renowned a specialist Dr. Who is in the given field and what an honor it would be to have the opportunity to learn from him. On the other hand, "why you" essay may list actual achievements that make you the fittest candidate to learn from such a recognized specialist as Dr. With this particularity out of our way, let's take a look at some examples of different types of "why this college" essay prompts, to get a clearer idea of which is which: "Why us": What about this school appeals to you? Why do you think that we are your right choice? What is the best thing about studying with us? Why do you want to continue your studies after high school at all? What are your interests and why do you think that being here will aid them? What about our curriculum do you find most exciting? What would be your contribution to our college life? How do you see yourself in our school? Why did you choose to send your application here? Naturally, every college will word their prompts differently, so it makes little sense to give any real-life examples here. All you need to do is to "decipher" their wording. Be sure that it will go down to one of your formulations. When we speak about writing, it is all about enumerating the advantages that the success of your application will grant applicants and the school and sounding sincerely optimistic about it. How do you do this? How do you comprehensively list all the shining opportunities that open not only before you but before the school in case of your successful enrollment? Importantly, how do you achieve this in such a modest-sized text typically, about words in two paragraphs? To answer these questions, we will have to walk you through each step applicants need to take to write a winning "why this college" essay. Surely, you have already written essays before, so you should know that your work on any essay should begin with a thorough research, and this type of essay is no exception. Then, formulate your topic in a way that will correspond to your writing aspirations — in other words, make up your mind about what exactly you would like to write in this small piece of text. Only then, move on to writing itself. Let us take a closer look at each of these steps: STEP 1: Researching for "why this college" essay Just the same as with any other essay, applicants need to be familiar with the subject-matter about which they are to write. In this case, it is the college to which they are applying to. So, where students can find this information? And, more importantly, if this information is already well-known, how do you make it sound genuine and exciting in your essay? As a matter of fact, the information about any given school is always available to applicants, but so you don't need to overthink it, we will list the ways you can get this information: Visiting the campus. All schools are interested in attracting as many applicants as they possibly can. For this purpose, they advertise themselves. Among other ways in which they do it is offering potential applicants guided tours. Embarking on such a tour is often an exciting undertaking in itself. But if you go there, with all the fun that you may be having, you need to remember that you are on a mission to collect data about the school. So, be equipped to take notes. For that, you can use either a pen and a paper, or your smartphone. The essential information that you write down should include your tour guide's name, a few facts about the school that caught your attention these can be surprising, funny, or just inspiring and uplifting , and, of course, some general facts — the architecture and looks, the most important points in the school's history, college traditions, etc. Mind that while you are on this tour, you can obtain valuable information not only from your tour guide. You may try and exchange a few words with the students or even professors about how they enjoy being there, what was their initial impression of the school and whether it persisted, was there anything about the college life that took them aback and to which they had to adjust, etc. In fact, if you already have your "why this college" essay prompt, you can simply paraphrase it and ask them that. Don't rely on your memory, be sure to have their answers written down! Visiting the campus virtually. It may happen that the school you are applying to is too geographically remote from the place where you live. There may also be other objective reasons why you cannot take a guided tour of your target school. Fortunately, today's technologies can help remote applicants out. Simply go to your school's website and find a virtual tour around their campus. Alternatively, look for virtual tours on such online resources as youniversitytv. Colleges also often ask some of their students to provide their contact data on college websites. So, here is your way to connect with students remotely and ask them whatever you have to ask. Once again, you may even paraphrase your essay prompt and ask them that. Interviewing an alumnus. Alumni interviews are not an uncommon practice. Interviewing an alumnus of the school to which you are applying is a perfect chance to get all the information about this school. Formulate your questions in a way which will allow getting all the information you need, including your essay prompt answer. Of course, remember to take notes! Attending college fairs. All high school students who wish to continue their studies at college are encouraged to attend college fairs, facilitating their choice of school. Students who have already made up their minds about the school they are applying to may feel like there is no need to attend such events. Nevertheless, attending college fairs can still prove beneficial for the applicants. Most people who attend such fairs just pick a pile of brochures and go home. This should not be your case. Even though brochures and other hand-out materials are valid research material for a "why this college" essay, do not limit yourself to that info. The people at your college's stand at a fair are usually volunteering students who should be friendly to the fair attendants. The essay prompt reads: "Given your interests, values, and goals, explain why Oberlin College will help you grow as a student and a person during your undergraduate years. Early in my college search I learned that I prefer a liberal arts college to a larger university. The collaboration between the faculty and undergraduate students, the sense of community, and the flexible, interdisciplinary nature of the curriculum are all important to me. I plan to major in Environmental Studies at Oberlin. Finally, as the rest of my application clearly demonstrates, music is an important part of my life. What better place than Oberlin to do so? With more performances than days in the year and a large group of talented musicians in the Conservatory of Music, Oberlin is an ideal place for exploring my love of both music and the environment. Understanding the Essay Prompt To understand the strength of the essay, we must first look at the prompt: the admissions officers at Oberlin want you to "explain why Oberlin College will help you grow. A strong "Why This College" essay will make a case for why the school in question is a good fit for the student. The case should be made by connecting facts about the school—unique opportunities, educational values, campus culture, et cetera—with the student's goals, values, and interests.

So, no general features such as the school's reputation or the weather in the school's locality are good topics for such an essay, unless these features are absolutely unique. For example, if your school is very specialized and has a small number of students like the Webb Institute, for instanceyou can talk about how you find it comfortable and inspiring to work and live in a small community If you are a fan of the school's sports team, it is also not a splendid idea to write why it in your college for two reasons.

First, it is overused. Second, rooting for the school's example does not require being at this school. Are there unique example programs or undergraduate research opportunities that will enhance your learning experience?

Why stand-out essay seamlessly and incisively connects the essays that the school offers to your unique interest and talents. Instead of letter grades, students receive qualitative evaluations from their professors. All colleges are taught by professors, never TAs, and research opportunities for undergraduates abound. You plan on essay a graduate degree and want to immerse yourself in research throughout your undergraduate years.

You are craving direct contact with faculty.